New To The Electric Universe
I have no significant academic achievements to parade for anyone to inspect. Through my career I have instead gained a good deal of knowledge and experience of electrical, electronic and computer engineering, radio communications, and I believe, a decent measure of common sense and the ability to think logically. Perhaps ironically, the absence of an academic moulding may have left me with an ability to more easily see some of the clues that come our way as our awareness of the world and our universe expands. Technical hobbies and group projects of a practical nature have always been more to my taste than involvement with large crowds or a need to maintain a competitive edge. One such area of interest that gripped me strongly when I was very young was the subject of astronomy. I remember hearing the comments my father would make as he gave “his opinions” back to our black and white television when Patrick Moore (eventually to become Sir Patrick) of ‘The Sky at Night’ programme fame here in the UK, was explaining the objects and events we were beginning to observe in detail in the heavens above. Since then, a lack of funds and cold and cloudy nights here in Scotland have steered my interest in astronomy towards the mental challenge of understanding what I can about the workings of our universe. Looking back, this could be considered the low-cost option, because learning from the work of others through books and other sources, does not necessarily come with the additional expense of buying equipment; here speaks a careful Scotsman! This change of emphasis was also the start of my journey into cosmology, physics and other related areas. This, as an overall period of learning, was ultimately to unfold in ways I would never have predicted back then. So began the journey which led me to the realisation that there is a very big and very important alternative story to be told about our universe and our assumed level of understanding.  Given what we currently know about our universe that can be relied upon, we nevertheless remain unclear about where things are going, and so in general, we continue to be at odds with each other about almost all of what we think we know.  If we are to advance our knowledge of our majestic and mysterious universe, through the best ways of doing science, then there are some fundamental changes that need to be made.
© NewToEU 2017
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For more Electric Universe information please visit: www.holoscience.com and www.thunderbolts.info

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About the author Tom Findlay for the inquisitive lay person
© NewToEU 2017
I have no significant academic achievements to parade for anyone to inspect. Through my career I have instead gained a  good deal of knowledge and experience of electrical, electronic and computer engineering, radio communications, and I believe, a decent measure of common sense and the ability to think logically. Perhaps ironically, the absence of an academic moulding may have left me with an ability to more easily see some of the clues that come our way as our awareness of the world and our universe expands. Technical hobbies and group projects of a practical nature have always been more to my taste than involvement with large crowds or a need to maintain a competitive edge. One such area of interest that gripped me strongly when I was very young was the subject of astronomy. I remember hearing the comments my father would make as he gave “his opinions” back to our black and white television when Patrick Moore (eventually to become Sir Patrick) of ‘The Sky at Night’ programme fame here in the UK, was explaining the objects and events we were beginning to observe in detail in the heavens above. Since then, a lack of funds and cold and cloudy nights here in Scotland have steered my interest in astronomy towards the mental challenge of understanding what I can about the workings of our universe. Looking back, this could be considered the low-cost option, because learning from the work of others through books and other sources, does not necessarily come with the additional expense of buying equipment; here speaks a careful Scotsman! This change of emphasis was also the start of my journey into cosmology, physics and other related areas. This, as an overall period of learning, was ultimately to unfold in ways I would never have predicted back then. So began the journey which led me to the realisation that there is a very big and very important alternative story to be told about our universe and our assumed level of understanding.  Given what we currently know about our universe that can be relied upon, we nevertheless remain unclear about where things are going, and so in general, we continue to be at odds with each other about almost all of what we think we know.  If we are to advance our knowledge of our majestic and mysterious universe, through the best ways of doing science, then there are some fundamental changes that need to be made.
Tom Findlay NewToEU A Beginnerís View of Our Electric Universe
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